Auld Lang Syne
by Robert Burns

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And days o’ lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet
For auld lang syne!

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pu’d the gowans fine,
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary foot
Sin’ auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl’t in the burn
Frae morning sun till dine,
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
Sin’ auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere,
And gie’s a hand o’ thine,
And we’ll tak a right guid willie-waught
For auld lang syne!

And surely ye’ll be your pint’ stoup,
And surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet
For auld lang syne!

(Translation)  
Times Long Gone  
by Robert Burns
  

Should old acquaintances be forgotten,
And never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintances be forgotten,
And days of long ago !

Chorus:
For old long ago, my dear
For old long ago,
We will take a cup of kindness yet
For old long ago.

We two have run about the hillsides
And pulled the daisies fine,
But we have wandered many a weary foot
For old long ago.

We two have paddled (waded) in the stream
From noon until dinner time,
But seas between us broad have roared
Since old long ago.

And there is a hand, my trusty friend,
And give us a hand of yours,
And we will take a goodwill draught (of ale)
For old long ago!

And surely you will pay for your pint,
And surely I will pay for mine!
And we will take a cup of kindness yet
For old long ago!




Rabbie Burns
Robert Burns, or Rabbie as he was known, was the son of a farmer, born in Alloway, Ayrshire, in the southwest of Scotland on January 25, 1759. He worked at several trades prior to turning to publishing his poetry as a source of income: first as a farmer, which damaged his health, and then as a flax weaver. He failed at both.

He began writing poetry in 1784 and his first collection of poems, The Kilmarnock Edition (named for the city of publication), was published in 1786. In 1788, he began working as a tax collector while continuing to write poetry; he also collected, revised, and wrote folk songs.

He married Jean Armour, the mother of one of his illegitimate children, and he died on July 21, 1796, aged 37.

He is famous for his poetry and his songs, some of which are: Auld Lang Syne; Comin’ Thro the Rye; Sweet Afton; Scots Wha Hae; Green Grow the Rashes; and A Red, Red, Rose.

In addition there is, The Selkirk Grace – a grace before meals and Address to a Haggis, both of which are used at Burns Suppers – Burns Night celebrations held around the anniversary of his birth in Scottish communities worldwide.

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